Nicklaus Gaut’s 2023 Outfielder Ranks

We’ve now covered my ranks at catcher, first base, second base, third base, and shortstop, before making a stop in Splitsville last week. Let’s close our hitters out – time to hit that grass.

It’s not that the outfielders are shallow by talent but depending on your league and roster size, eventually, you’ll reach a cliff past which full-time players are few and far between. Full and part platoons start wreaking havoc on projecting final production, and while some part-timers will still end up with enough playing time to be fantasy-viable, trying to properly judge their value from week to week may be a fantasy headache some managers just may not want.

In 10-team leagues and below and 12-team leagues with (3) OF slots, you likely won’t feel a pinch. But in 12-teamers with (5) OF slots, and any leagues deeper, full-time jobs in the outfield are going to dry up sooner than you think. Plan accordingly by knowing thy self. If you don’t mind trolling the wire and knowing the schedule well enough to know when it’s a good idea to swap in the Trayce Thompsons and TJ Friedls of the world, you might want to push outfielders some in your roster building. But if you’re more of the “set it and forget it” type, I’d suggest making sure you’ve got your starters locked up early.

Okay, enough – it’s rank-thirty. We’ll start with how everyone performed in 2022. Here were the top 110 outfielders by rank, along with ADP data from 2022 and 2023. Values are calculated for a 12-team league and ADP is from NFBC (n=30):

And here are the same top 110 from above, this time with their 5×5 roto stats, by half and for the full season:

One more note before we get to my personal ranks. Many of the initial projections have not yet baked in what the rule changes will do to stolen bases and batting average. If my projections look different from others in these categories, this is probably near the root. Look me in the eyes – right here. Those changes are coming and they will shift values. For those drafting now, there are edges to be found before the market adjusts.

Enough of all that jazz. Actually, a little more Jazz. You’ll notice Jazz Chisholm Jr. included, as the Marlins are apparently happy to have him man centerfield in 2023. So, even though he won’t gain eligibility for 10 games on most platforms, I decided to go ahead and get out in front of any “so, where would Jazz rank on here” questions.

Okay, now that’s enough of all that – here are my current OF projections, followed by all of the total tiers you’re used to normally. There is a sortable table at the end.

Tier: Will the Real Tyler O’Neill Please Step Forward?

Tyler O’Neill, STL (103 ADP, min: 61, max: 143)

Will it be last year, two years ago, or somewhere in between?

Tyler O’Neill 2021 – 2022
Season PA HR R RBI SB AVG OBP SLG wOBA wRC+
2021 537 34 89 80 15 .286 .352 .560 .384 144
2022 383 14 56 58 14 .228 .308 .392 .307 101

Did O’Neill just regress back to the same Tyler we knew prior to his 2021 breakout? Or was it more about being injured while also sprinkling in some batted-ball bad luck?

Looking at his per-PA roto rates from 2021 and 2022, the O’Neill we saw in the second half of the latter, looked a lot more like the one we saw from the former:

Tyler O’Neill Per-PA Roto Rates
2021 1st half 2nd half 2022
PA 537 198 185 383
HR per PA .063 .020 .054 .037
R per PA .166 .116 .178 .146
RBI per PA .149 .141 .162 .151
SB per PA .028 .030 .043 .037

And while his .286 AVG (.366 BABIP) from 2021 always felt above his pay grade, a .228 AVG in 2022 also felt undeserved. And a .277 BABIP that was 60 points lower than his career average entering the season certainly did him no favors.

O’Neill’s true fantasy calling card was his power, however, and a closer look tells much of the same story as above. A rotten first half followed by a second half that looked more like 2021:

Tyler O’Neill Power Numbers 2021-2022
2021 1st half 2nd half 2022
PA 537 198 185 383
HR per PA .063 .020 .054 .037
FB% 31.5 20.3 30.4 25.2
HR/FB% 34.0 16.0 28.6 23.3
Brl% 17.9 8.9 13.9 11.3
Air% EV 98.9 94.1 98.4 96.1
Air% (100+ mph) 55.1 32.3 53.4 42.5

O’Neill dealt with injuries to his shoulder, wrist, and two different hamstring injuries but in a healthy second half (at least until it ended in mid-September), O’Neill’s per-PA roto rates and high-end exit velocities jumped right back up to near where they were in 2021. And in health, lies the rub. The downside is clear but the upside is that if he collects somewhere near 550 PA, in what looks to be an excellent St. Louis offense, O’Neill is a top 20 OF and an easy bargain at his current price.

Tier: The Arizona Issue

Corbin Carroll, ARI (83 ADP, min: 49, max: 156)

You can’t help but love the fantasy-friendly skill set that Corbin Carroll brings to the table and I’m projecting the homers and stolen bases to both come in around as expected. And with the trade of Dalton Varsho, the lineup has gotten a lot less crowded. But the differences between failing, meeting, and exceeding his cost might come down to his teammates.

Given the current state of the bottom of Arizona’s lineup, you’d have to squint re-eally hard to imagine Carroll’s RBI total to earn much categorical gravy for you. However, the ones coming behind him who can most move his Run total, also come with big questions. Will Ketel ever get off the rocks? Can Jake McCarthy and Christian Walker replicate their 2022 breakouts? If they do, Carroll could blow past 80 runs and be a fantasy force. But if they don’t, a sub-70 runs total will be a drag on his ultimate ROI.

Tier: Bounceback Fever?

Nick Castellanos, PHI (126 ADP, min: 88, max: 156)

The best thing about buying back in on Nick Castellanos is the draft-day discount, with my fellow Nick averaging around a 50-pick drop compared to last season. For that price (and in that home park), I’m willing to chance that Castellanos won’t again post roto rates that were his worst since the early Detroit years. And even with those rough numbers, Castellanos still finished as a top 50 OF in 12-team leagues. That’s not what you’re banking on from a top-20 OF draft price but it’s also not hot garbage.

Castellanos’s power outage was the source of much of his fantasy woes but he, at least, did increase from .021 HR per PA to .028 HR/PA in the second half. It probably wasn’t a coincidence that he increased from a 10% HR/FB* in the first half to a 15% HR/FB in the second half. But even with the increase, a 12% HR/FB for the season was a far cry from 28%, 31%, and 20% for the past three seasons.

*Again, this is calculated without IFFB, so the numbers will be different than here at FanGraphs (1st half: 8.2%, 2nd half: 9.4%)

He doesn’t have to get back to hitting 30+ HR to pull a good ROI; getting near 25 HR will do it, especially baking in a little batting average bump he should see from the new shift rules. That’s an easy bet to make at his current cost.

Tier: Don’t Be Yandy Díaz, Don’t Be Yandy Díaz, Don’t Be Yandy Diaz

Oscar Gonzalez, CLE (176 ADP, min: 138, max: 204)

I want Oscar Gonzalez to be fantasy gold; I really do. To believe that his second-half power surge (.015 HR per PA to .036 HR per PA) signaled more power to come in 2023, pairing a high batting average with 20+ HR potential and good R+RBI possibilities on an offense on the rise. But that power surge came with a doubling of his HR/FB rate, while a 20% FB% (IFFB not included), though up from 16% FB%, stayed in the league basement. And while his Brl% and Brl per PA also rose in the second half, his Air% EV and Air% (100+ mph) both dropped significantly.

Gonzalez’s plate discipline also leaves a lot to be desired. A 20% K% in 2022 was below average but a 16% SwStr% that stayed steady from half to half says a big sniff of whiff regression is headed downwind. Checking out his swing rates by zone doesn’t bring any more confidence. His zSwing% dropped four points in the second half, while his Chase% increased by six points. His 34 zSwing% – oSwing% in the first half was already well below average but dropping 10 points in the second half put him in a whole new tier of awful – of qualified hitters in the second half, only Javier Baez was worse.

I was totally prepared to scoop a lot of Oscar but his draft price is far more aggressive than I anticipated, especially with those pitch selection issues. My shares will still be there but they’ll likely be quite spare.

Tier: So, You’ve Decided to Punt Power

Jake McCarthy, ARI (124 ADP, min: 83, max: 163)

Jeff McNeil, NYM (180 ADP, min: 137, max: 240)

Steven Kwan, CLE (119 ADP, min: 137, max: 146)

Two of these players are on good or up-and-coming offenses. And the other is Jake McCarthy. Not only does the speedy McCarthy have the same fantasy issues as his teammate Carroll above (RE: Arizona offense) but I expect the SB calling card that drives much of his value will be cheapened by the influx of stolen bases coming due to the rule changes.

McCarthy won a lot of fantasy leagues for players last season but his price (and skillset) likely keeps him off of my board.

I suppose Jeff McNeil could find his way onto my roster in drafts where he falls closer to his max ADP but his average, let alone minimum (#137? Really?), is going to be far too rich for me. While I am a fan of getting secondary pieces from what I expect to be a really good Mets offense, McNeil’s average-driven fantasy profile won’t be worth as much in a no-shift world.

Many others have said it but it bears repeating; don’t pay a premium today for last year’s production.

Steven Kwan will come with even fewer dongs than the McTwins above and also gets a lot of his fantasy value from what I think will be depressed assets (AVG + SB) under the new rules. The difference is that Kwan, while not as high in either category as one of the other two, is a plus contributor in both categories, not just one.

Along with a spot at the top of a good Cleveland lineup, that makes Kwan my favorite among the HR-challenged options, if wanting to travel along that build.

Little Name Lotto Tickets

Jose Siri, TB (345 ADP, min: 258, max: 417)

Stone Garrett, WSH (644 ADP, min: 405, max: 584)

If I’ve said it once, I’ve said it at least eight other times – Tampa Bay hates your team and Kevin Cash wants nothing more than to happily come-a reaping and dance on our fantasy graves. And yet, here I am, well above the market on Jose Siri. You’re a fool, Nicklaus! A fool!

There are exciting fantasy parts under the hood, though. Siri’s sprint speed is in the 100th percentile and he picked up 14 SB in just 325 PA last season, and while 7 HR over the same span isn’t overly impressive, you can at least dream of 15 HR potential.

But besides those sexy counting stats, there is a big problem. Like, is he actually a good hitter? Siri slashed just .225/.278/.375 over 325 PA in 2022, with just a .268 wOBA and 75 wRC+. He was pretty bad vs RHP (.232/.283/.371, .288 wOBA, 30% K%) but was just plain rotten vs LHP (.156/.224/.247, .213 wOBA, 43.5% K%). Obviously, the Rays will not put up with this sort of ineptness and Siri is destined for a bench role until ultimately getting traded to Pittsburgh.

But not so fast! As in, “being so fast makes Siri a plus-plus centerfielder“. And if there’s one thing that Tampa Bay has proven, it’s that they’re willing to overlook a lot of offensive shortcomings in the name of playing an elite centerfielder.

Siri will likely be a batting average sink but his counting stats potential could be worth the dart if his glove keeps him in a big role.

Okay, so I have a soft spot for Stone Garrett, whose physical skills make it hard for me not to dream of his ROI possibilities being more malleable than what his steely ADP is telling me.

Sure, the now 27-year-old only just made it to the big leagues last season, and once he did, did a whole lot of whiffing (32% K%, 17% SwStr%) and not much walking (3.6% BB%). But over a very tiny 84 PA sample, Garrett did the most he could with his cup of coffee, slashing .276/.309/.539, with  4 HR, 13 R, 10 RBI, and 3 SB. And that was after a terrific Triple-A campaign, with 28 HR and 15 SB in just 440 PA.

And then he was promptly designated for assignment. But that’s a good thing, right? Garrett had no real chance to start in what was a crowded Arizona outfield, while Washington is populated with the likes of Lane Thomas and Corey Dickerson. I’m counting it as a win.

The most likely outcome is that Garrett is a fill-in fourth outfielder who mostly bats vs LHP. But hey, a guy can dream, right? Mine are just filled with Statcast lollipops in nothing but red – “la-la-lah, K%, la-la-lah, I can’t hear you”.

Tier: Quick Hit Prove-Its

Prove your health hasn’t been compromised by a balky back and plantar fasciitis, Kris Bryant. He might not be that old (31) in baseball-years and plays in the best offensive park in MLB but Bryant only played 42 games last year, with the missed time coming due to two of the more notorious injuries there are for sucking away health and production.

Prove you can rack 500 PAs AND a .250 AVG in the same season, Giancarlo Stanton. If you do, your 30+ HR will make a 142 ADP a bargain. Or, you’ll sneeze one day, causing one or both of your calves to flat fall right off.

Prove that somewhere, anywhere, there is a shred of what you once were, still hiding in your soul, Cody Bellinger. In a hitter-friendly park that can play like Coors when the wind is right, Bellinger could, in theory, do some fantasy damage in a sneaky-fun Cubs lineup. Or…Well, never mind. We all know what the “or” is, right?

Prove you really are one of the rare prospects that don’t break out until his late-20s, Joey Meneses. And not just another flash-in-the-pan that inevitably gets exposed by adjusting pitchers.

The skill set (if repeated) is an intriguing one but a .371 BABIP and .267 xBA says regression is about to hammer his .324 AVG way down. As does a 26% HR/FB (never higher than 19% in the minors) say about his home run rates. I still think Meneses could end up being a decent fantasy asset, as Washington will give him every chance to be an everyday player, and thus compile a decent amount of R+RBI. But I’d greatly adjust the expectations set by a 30+ HR pace in 2022.

Prove you still have a full-time job, Gavin Lux. And after that, prove that your skill set will ever actually be fantasy-friendly enough to justify being drafted. Double prove it – Boom!

Prove that I must just be actually bonkers, Brandon Marsh because that’s how your top 300 ADP makes me feel. Just, why? Please? Can someone tell me? Hold on – not so fast, Philly fan. Someone reasonable, please.

Prove your wrist isn’t made of glass, Alex Kirilloff.  If it isn’t and Kirilloff actually plays a full season, he could be one of the draft’s best deals. As a long-time supporter, I really want it to be true but history and surgery(s) aren’t close to being on his side.

Prove you’re not just a platoon bat, Juan Yepez. Right now, the St. Louis offense looks to be popping – but also very full. With the left-handed Nolan Gorman having nowhere to play in the field (and no, “maybe he’ll get better at second base” is not currently being accepted as an answer), Yepez is staring down a short-sided barrel.

2023 Outfielder Ranks
ADP Pos Rk Player Position(s) 2022 2023 G PA HR R RBI SB AVG
3 1 Ronald Acuña Jr. OF 17 1 149 673 31 111 83 37 .284
4 2 Aaron Judge OF 1 2 147 652 44 115 112 13 .288
4 3 Julio Rodríguez OF 2 3 151 660 30 103 89 31 .287
17 8 Fernando Tatis Jr. SS, OF 4 128 556 36 98 95 27 .279
7 4 Kyle Tucker OF 4 5 152 620 32 91 103 23 .294
10 6 Juan Soto OF 32 6 152 666 33 110 96 12 .293
9 5 Yordan Alvarez OF 6 7 141 591 38 97 108 2 .309
12 7 Mookie Betts OF 3 8 146 655 30 113 80 16 .278
46 12 Jazz Chisholm Jr. 2B (OF) 9 137 577 29 82 74 32 .265
20 9 Mike Trout OF 12 10 140 616 39 103 98 5 .281
28 10 Michael Harris II OF 11 11 140 587 19 84 77 27 .278
38 11 Randy Arozarena OF 7 12 150 633 20 84 83 31 .259
49 13 Luis Robert Jr. OF 42 13 135 581 22 80 82 20 .285
54 16 Adolis García OF 5 14 151 644 27 84 91 24 .246
50 14 Cedric Mullins OF 8 15 148 627 19 83 62 32 .259
52 15 Kyle Schwarber OF 10 16 151 641 42 93 97 8 .244
103 24 Tyler O’Neill OF 53 17 133 539 27 80 79 20 .261
89 22 Bryan Reynolds OF 30 18 150 650 23 80 85 11 .281
70 17 Teoscar Hernández OF 22 19 137 574 28 76 84 10 .265
72 18 Eloy Jiménez OF 64 20 140 588 30 74 95 0 .285
77 20 Starling Marte OF 15 21 128 547 13 73 66 26 .280
83 21 Corbin Carroll OF 22 133 572 16 76 63 24 .258
126 31 Nick Castellanos OF 51 23 138 587 24 83 80 8 .274
77 19 George Springer OF 13 24 135 587 24 89 74 13 .269
100 23 Byron Buxton OF 54 25 122 510 30 77 72 11 .259
124 30 Christian Yelich OF 20 26 148 638 18 90 61 18 .254
108 25 Seiya Suzuki OF 57 27 139 584 21 73 74 13 .266
153 36 Ian Happ OF 29 28 154 641 21 77 77 13 .254
130 32 Anthony Santander OF 31 29 148 629 30 77 87 1 .258
121 27 Taylor Ward OF 25 30 137 579 23 76 69 9 .268
124 29 Jake McCarthy OF 33 31 134 560 10 67 61 33 .259
119 26 Steven Kwan OF 16 32 145 624 6 78 52 20 .288
171 38 Brandon Nimmo OF 23 33 147 666 16 95 66 4 .277
170 37 Mitch Haniger OF 123 34 137 596 23 75 77 1 .263
145 35 Hunter Renfroe OF 37 35 133 532 28 70 77 2 .245
139 33 Andrew Vaughn 1B, OF 46 36 141 592 21 68 77 0 .264
142 34 Giancarlo Stanton OF 56 37 123 507 31 67 81 0 .238
123 28 Kris Bryant OF 38 129 555 20 79 70 2 .277
180 41 Jeff McNeil 2B, OF 21 39 145 604 11 71 65 7 .301
175 40 Oscar Gonzalez OF 76 40 128 531 17 70 72 1 .281
182 43 Lars Nootbaar OF 88 41 133 545 23 75 68 9 .257
181 42 Cody Bellinger OF 48 42 138 552 21 72 67 15 .237
237 56 Bryan De La Cruz OF 89 43 130 545 23 68 67 9 .269
193 45 Joey Meneses 1B, OF 79 44 139 581 23 68 75 3 .257
215 50 Masataka Yoshida OF 45 124 521 15 68 57 3 .284
218 49 Andrew Benintendi OF 47 46 135 568 15 72 58 10 .279
173 39 Harrison Bader OF 77 47 136 538 14 64 58 23 .250
199 47 Alex Verdugo OF 35 48 142 600 12 72 68 8 .283
199 48 Seth Brown 1B, OF 39 49 136 537 24 62 70 12 .249
186 44 Whit Merrifield 2B, OF 38 50 126 530 11 65 53 20 .264
234 55 Joc Pederson OF 36 51 131 504 20 61 66 5 .264
223 51 Ramón Laureano OF 90 52 129 529 17 63 55 17 .239
198 46 Riley Greene OF 112 53 139 601 12 68 63 9 .251
266 60 Esteury Ruiz OF 54 105 432 7 50 34 29 .245
230 54 Michael Conforto OF 55 130 543 17 70 64 5 .253
247 58 Christopher Morel 2B, OF 63 56 119 470 19 57 54 16 .230
260 59 Wil Myers 1B, OF 118 57 132 541 17 61 63 9 .248
223 52 Lourdes Gurriel Jr. OF 63 58 134 535 13 60 57 4 .282
330 75 Trent Grisham OF 101 59 135 544 17 65 55 14 .234
304 70 Garrett Mitchell OF 60 114 451 10 48 42 22 .244
244.73 57 Randal Grichuk OF 43 61 128 493 20 60 68 5 .247
317.57 73 Jake Fraley OF 110 62 117 468 16 59 52 11 .250
288.87 66 Lane Thomas OF 58 63 131 542 15 66 51 15 .238
272.27 63 Austin Meadows OF 64 123 508 15 58 54 7 .267
345.37 79 Jose Siri OF 99 65 125 500 15 58 48 22 .224
271.23 61 Jesse Winker OF 111 66 124 521 18 64 63 1 .264
289.8 67 Charlie Blackmon OF 41 67 125 519 12 58 63 5 .271
273.03 64 Trey Mancini 1B, OF 75 68 140 584 19 71 68 0 .252
296 69 Jorge Soler OF 141 69 127 533 23 63 70 1 .243
467.13 93 Andrew McCutchen OF 49 70 129 535 17 59 63 9 .246
331.93 76 Manuel Margot OF 82 71 119 486 9 55 49 16 .251
481.03 95 Edward Olivares OF 72 115 451 12 51 48 12 .264
280.23 65 Nick Gordon 2B, OF 69 73 122 499 16 61 56 6 .239
350.7 80 Chris Taylor 2B, OF 91 74 135 520 13 63 53 14 .237
344.6 78 Brendan Donovan 2B, 3B, OF 71 75 132 528 8 64 52 7 .270
327.4 74 Marcell Ozuna OF 72 76 116 484 22 56 60 2 .249
228.37 53 Gavin Lux 2B, OF 62 77 125 481 9 57 46 11 .265
271.6 62 Austin Hays OF 59 78 139 556 15 63 66 6 .243
371 83 Mark Canha OF 50 79 136 554 12 66 64 4 .245
370 82 Oswaldo Cabrera OF 80 116 470 14 51 53 15 .248
493.97 97 Trayce Thompson OF 93 81 111 438 21 53 63 8 .231
522.67 102 TJ Friedl OF 120 82 108 437 14 54 44 12 .253
342.4 77 Dylan Carlson OF 95 83 126 498 11 59 51 8 .259
369.5 81 Avisaíl García OF 137 84 132 521 17 55 60 8 .241
415.47 85 Mike Yastrzemski OF 70 85 132 514 18 65 59 6 .234
555.03 105 Tyrone Taylor OF 78 86 121 478 20 55 55 8 .238
502.23 100 AJ Pollock OF 68 87 110 442 15 52 55 6 .259
376.53 84 Oscar Colas OF 88 114 462 16 50 56 7 .255
436.57 89 Michael Brantley OF 124 89 113 487 8 59 48 3 .285
429.83 88 Harold Ramírez 1B, OF 61 90 110 440 10 49 54 7 .273
498 99 Tommy Pham OF 40 91 119 494 14 62 49 10 .245
421.8 86 Max Kepler OF 108 92 122 499 16 61 56 6 .239
293.7 68 Brandon Marsh OF 65 93 124 490 10 53 47 14 .235
445.67 92 Enrique Hernández OF 128 94 124 528 16 64 60 2 .248
495.9 98 Leody Taveras OF 85 95 123 483 10 49 42 19 .243
477.13 94 Jurickson Profar OF 52 96 121 508 11 61 47 9 .246
312.47 72 Jarred Kelenic OF 97 105 420 16 51 46 11 .219
602.77 120 Kyle Stowers OF 98 108 427 14 47 51 4 .254
441.8 91 Joey Gallo OF 127 99 116 471 23 57 61 5 .209
554.97 104 Adam Frazier 2B, OF 81 100 125 508 5 56 45 12 .249
608.7 122 Adam Duvall OF 134 101 115 437 22 53 64 1 .224
491.87 96 Aledmys Díaz 2B, OF 117 102 115 460 15 47 53 4 .256
557.8 107 Tony Kemp 2B, OF 73 103 130 529 8 55 40 10 .255
513.57 101 Kerry Carpenter OF 104 106 426 15 50 48 3 .251
605.17 121 Ji Hwan Bae OF 105 88 351 4 42 33 19 .265
572.37 111 Dylan Moore SS, OF 75 106 87 339 10 44 32 22 .220
644.17 127 Stone Garrett OF 107 79 325 14 40 41 11 .244
597.87 116 Akil Baddoo OF 152 108 106 408 9 44 37 17 .231
640.47 126 Brian Anderson 3B, OF 109 105 415 14 48 52 4 .248
691.8 132 Yonathan Daza OF 83 110 115 451 3 52 41 7 .282
428.23 87 Alex Kirilloff OF 111 100 396 11 43 48 3 .267
557.83 108 Chas McCormick OF 80 112 110 418 14 51 47 8 .237
737.77 148 Tyler Naquin OF 98 113 102 365 13 43 48 7 .248
615.37 124 Eddie Rosario OF 155 114 108 417 11 43 48 5 .258
644.9 128 Nick Senzel OF 122 115 107 414 7 47 38 11 .252
577.8 113 Jack Suwinski OF 116 95 378 16 43 44 7 .237
602.2 119 Victor Robles OF 93 117 119 452 8 45 35 16 .232
662.23 130 Miguel Andújar OF 118 98 392 10 42 41 6 .263
700.13 133 Michael A. Taylor OF 86 119 117 433 9 45 42 9 .241
713.43 139 David Peralta OF 87 120 115 449 13 46 49 1 .252
581.07 114 Matt Vierling OF 109 121 95 353 8 42 36 10 .247
609.07 123 Kevin Kiermaier OF 136 122 105 378 7 45 36 11 .237
735.67 147 Robbie Grossman OF 125 123 105 410 8 45 39 10 .232
304.27 71 Juan Yepez OF 132 124 83 328 15 39 43 1 .247
601.83 118 LaMonte Wade Jr. 1B, OF 151 125 95 361 13 44 37 5 .236
711.1 137 Conner Capel OF 126 92 361 8 35 36 8 .245
440.6 90 Bubba Thompson OF 127 78 296 4 31 23 19 .231
577.53 112 Nolan Jones OF 128 80 322 10 42 34 4 .259
722.47 143 Austin Slater OF 71 129 81 271 5 34 25 10 .259
557.83 109 James Outman OF 130 91 350 11 39 36 6 .233
728.83 145 Cal Mitchell OF 157 131 80 312 6 34 36 5 .264
557.2 106 Jesús Sánchez OF 129 132 88 348 14 40 43 0 .241
531.7 103 Hunter Dozier 1B, 3B, OF 100 133 90 356 11 36 38 5 .238
723.43 144 Kyle Isbel OF 131 134 83 286 7 32 31 10 .242
581.1 115 Will Brennan OF 135 68 275 4 31 30 6 .278
702.9 134 Nate Eaton OF 136 67 253 4 27 23 15 .243
686.6 131 Josh H. Smith 3B, OF 137 95 361 5 39 32 7 .245
567.87 110 Drew Waters OF 138 75 293 6 32 29 7 .238
648 129 Connor Joe 1B, OF 107 139 60 249 7 30 25 5 .242
623.1 125 Jarren Duran OF 150 140 55 217 4 27 20 9 .243
Ben Gamel OF 105 141 90 342 8 36 35 5 .243
718.4 141 Sam Haggerty OF 104 142 74 218 5 26 22 13 .240
714.57 140 Raimel Tapia OF 66 143 75 285 3 30 27 9 .264
709.57 135 JJ Bleday OF 162 144 80 308 9 30 31 6 .212
713.13 138 Corey Dickerson OF 126 145 80 266 5 29 31 1 .261
709.73 136 Trevor Larnach OF 146 73 288 8 33 31 1 .236
601.33 117 Josh Lowe OF 147 58 232 5 24 23 7 .232
750.8 150 Rob Refsnyder OF 148 81 267 6 34 31 2 .253
731.03 146 Aaron Hicks OF 94 149 90 331 7 35 32 5 .229
740 149 Mauricio Dubón SS, OF 154 150 80 260 6 29 28 5 .247

 





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equistmember
1 day ago

Siri? He has a k % rate projected to be 34.4, which is a good year for Joey Gallo, but he ain’t Joey Gallo. I can see that you’re dreaming about unlocking the power speed potential, but that’s it, potential, not kinetic. If you want to dream, dream about Suzuki.

equistmember
9 hours ago
Reply to  Nicklaus Gaut

His ISO was bad last year too.