The Training Room: Jose Altuve 2019 Outlook

2018 Knee Problems

Before a diagnosis was divulged, I watched Jose Altuve slide into second-base and come up a little gimpy in the playoffs warning bells were going in my head. He missed 3 weeks from late July to mid-August, and as I sorted through the possibilities of what could be wrong, I grew more and more pessimistic.

The fact that he was shut down for three weeks and still not healthy meant the problem was more than a simple muscle strain. If he had a meniscus problem, the Houston Astros would have addressed it mid-season, the recovery is quick and despite some pressure from the Oakland A’s and Seattle Mariners, was anyone genuinely concerned about the division?

2019 Outlook

Entering the 2019 draft season, one topic on many fantasy player’s minds is the viability of Jose Altuve’s knee and the risk associated with his recent surgery. I’m excited to inform you that I am very optimistic about Altuve and a bounce-back season in ’19.

An avulsion fracture means that the tip or end of a bone has broken off the main body of a bone. In most cases it is a tiny piece of bone and surgery doesn’t repair the piece; instead, the piece is removed. The healing and recovery after removal is much faster, less complicated, and more likely to succeed.

This small of a bone caused Altuve significant pain every time he swung the bat, attempted to sprint, or moved laterally on defense.  Removing this bone is similar to taking a thorn out of a tiger’s paw. The complete recovery process should only take a few months, leaving Altuve ready long before Spring training.

He’s only 28-years-old and stealing 18-24 bases should be a realistic expectation in 2019, making him realistic 20-20 threat with elite batting average. While he is not in the discussion to be drafted in the top five, his NFBC average draft position as of this writing is 16 and likely to rise as the season approaches. I see him paying dividends at virtually any spot.

We hoped you liked reading The Training Room: Jose Altuve 2019 Outlook by Dr. Mike Tanner!

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nickfox45
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nickfox45

I love seeing new content on the site, but this piece’s credibility is seriously hampered by the numerous grammatical issues. I’m supposed to take this author as an authority?

LightenUpFG
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Member

“I’m a doctor, not a grammar enthusiast!” – Bones Tanner

Seriously though, it wasn’t too bad. Glad to have the optimistic injury perspective on what was a concerning year from Altuve.

jason shure
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jason shure

I noticed some but not all of those, but didn’t care. I love this kind of stuff and would gobble up similar write-ups of other players.

Shauncore
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Member
Shauncore

Just some I caught:

First sentence is rough (get rid of the first “and”)
“Viable” should be viability
19′ should be ’19
“This small of bone caused”
“making he realistic”
“he is not the discussion to drafted in”
” as of this writing of sixteen” (don’t even know what this is trying to say)

It’s cool to get the opinion of an MD on here, but man…that was a tough read.

Ryan DC
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Ryan DC

Doctors, scientists, engineers, etc. are generally bad at writing.

jwpepa
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jwpepa

This is generally wrong. Try getting published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society if you are ‘bad at writing’. Lots of people enter these fields thinking they won’t have to write and then find out that publications are the currency professional programs and academics deal in. You really can’t cut it in these fields if you can’t write.

The world is a gray area. We try to make it black and white so it is easier on our brains. There are times and places for that but maybe it’s best to consider our sweeping generalizations in that context before stating our opinions as fact.

Leif
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Member
Leif

Why are you using “grammar bullying” to discourage content contribution made by non-english majors?

Great article, please write more!

Shauncore
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Member
Shauncore

Because it runs the risk of not being clear what the opinion is or giving off the wrong opinion entirely.

There are two sentences here, not inconsequential, that I don’t know what he is trying to say.

Basic grammar is a prerequisite to writing and there are editors here.

nickfox45
Member
Member
nickfox45

Not sure why you put quotes around “grammar bullying”, but rather than “grammar bully” you as well, I’ll answer your question. I had trouble understanding several points in this piece specifically because of these errors. I wanted to voice my opinion that this type of sloppy, error-filled writing does get noticed by the site’s paying members.