Relief Pitcher 2024 Fantasy Rankings

Thomas Shea-USA TODAY Sports

Relief pitchers are notoriously hard to evaluate; take a look at primary closers from even the beginning of last season and you’ll see incredible turnover. Players not ranked in the 2024 top 75 (plus one) who had at least partial stake in a closer job to start 2023 include Michael Fulmer, Kendall Graveman, Trevor May, Adam Ottavino, and Daniel Bard. If you told me right now that 25 or more of these players won’t be on the top 75 at the end of the year, I’d absolutely believe you!

So without further ado, here’s the top 75:

Changelog

  • 3/4/2024 – A little bit of rearranging within tiers after injury news on Robert Stephenson and Matt Brash.
  • 2/27/2024 – Knocked John Brebbia down, as he’s dealing with a calf strain.
  • 2/19/2024 – Dinged Gregory Santos a bit for coming into camp with lat soreness.
  • 2/12/2024 – No changes.
  • 2/5/2024 – A little bit of shuffling after the Gregory Santos trade.
  • 1/29/2024 – The Notable Free Agents section is gone, with Neris, Robertson, and Chapman all signing. John Brebbia was also added.
  • 1/22/2024 – Updates with Josh Hader and Robert Stephenson signings, most notably affecting Stephenson, Carlos Estévez, and Ryan Pressly.
  • 1/15/2024 – Updated after Jordan Hicks signing, bumping him down since he’ll be given a chance to start.
  • 1/8/2024 – First Release

Ranking Methodology

  • ADP is based on 30 day rolling Rotowire Online Championship values.
  • $ Values are based on standard 5×5 12 team league using the FanGraphs Depth Charts and these Auction Calculator settings. They default to a player’s most valuable position, so if the first base list includes a catcher, it will show that player’s value at catcher.
  • ADP and $ Values are updated as of the last update date on this post.
  • 5-game eligibility was used for these lists to cast the widest net.

Elites

The best of the best.
Elites
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
1 Edwin Díaz NYM RP 42 $19
2 Josh Hader HOU RP 47 $13
3 Emmanuel Clase CLE RP 53 $13

Edwin Díaz missed the entirety of 2023 after tearing his patellar tendon in the World Baseball Classic, but I’m not concerned about his ability to quickly regain his footing as the top closer in baseball after a brilliant 2022. He was under consideration to return late in 2023 so he should be a full go for Spring Training as he looks for a delayed second act to his unbelievable 50.2% strikeout rate and 1.31 ERA.

While his bottom-line numbers were typical, Josh Hader’s 2023 did have some slight dings under the hood. His 1.28 ERA is bested only by his 2021, and he picked up 33 saves, giving him 103 in the last three seasons. On the flip side, his strikeout and walk rates were the worst of his career; he kept his run-prevention numbers down thanks to a return to homer rates typical of Hader at his best. Keeping him second on the list is the fact that he’s getting paid like an elite closer and because of that he should have the job barring something like his initial Padres run down the stretch in 2022. Bryan Abreu and Ryan Pressly will probably keep Hader to the one-inning, traditional closer role he’s become accustomed to.

Similarly to Hader, Emmanuel Clase had good season but took a clear step back, with his even more clear than Hader’s. Clase’s ERA, strikeout rate, walk rate, and grounder rate all went in the wrong direction, perhaps driven by a cutter that was down half a tick in velocity. What keeps him in this tier is his sterling track record and the fact that even in a down year, he racked up 44 saves. Being the Guardians’s closer tends to lead to a lot of close games and as such, plenty of saves.

Oh So Close

Very minor quibbles to be made here.
Oh So Close
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
4 Jhoan Duran MIN RP 51 $16
5 Camilo Doval SFG RP 56 $10
6 Devin Williams MIL RP 43 $14
7 Evan Phillips LAD RP 90 $8
8 Raisel Iglesias ATL RP 60 $12
9 David Bednar PIT RP 64 $10

Jhoan Duran might have the filthiest stuff of any pitcher in the league, with a fastball north of 100mph and a “splinker” that can scrape triple digits. What holds him back is a strikeout rate that’s excellent but not elite, and more importantly, a new-school manager who doesn’t always use him to close. Rocco Baldelli isn’t afraid to deploy Duran in tighter situations earlier in the game, which can take saves away from him.

Camilo Doval was a well-deserved All-Star in 2023, breaking out as someone resembling Emmanuel Clase with worse command. Walks have been a slight issue for him (sometimes more than that), and he wore down a bit in the second half, with a 3.38 ERA compared to 2.63 before the break.

Devin Williams’s Airbender changeup has been considered one of the best pitches in baseball since his Rookie of the Year 2020 season, and it allowed the Brewers to feel comfortable trading Josh Hader at the deadline in 2022. Williams however, has had starker problems with bases on balls than his predecessor, and he was used a bit less than the typical closer in 2023, appearing in just 61 games (same as Hader).

Evan Phillips is coming off two excellent season with the Dodgers, the second of them as the team’s primary closer. What keeps him in the second tier is his usage; although the Dodgers won 100 games in 2023, Phillips saved just 24 games, with Dave Roberts sometimes deploying Phillips similarly to how Baldelli occasionally uses Duran.

Although Raisel Iglesias’s season started late due to a shoulder strain, it was more of the same Iglesias upon his return, with a 2.75 ERA and 33 saves. What might give some pause is his age (he’ll be in his age-34 season) in conjunction with that prior shoulder injury, as well as running into occasional homer issues.

Pittsburgh’s native son David Bednar had his first fully healthy season as a closer in 2023, and didn’t disappoint, putting up a 2.00 ERA and 39 saves. He does have a history of finicky back issues, though, and his strikeout rate dropped below 30% in 2023.

Filthy But Flawed

Excellent stuff, but cause for concern.
Filthy But Flawed
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
10 José Alvarado PHI RP 162 $8
11 Andrés Muñoz SEA RP 84 $15
12 Jordan Romano TOR RP 70 $11
13 Ryan Helsley STL RP 92 $11
14 Paul Sewald ARI RP 85 $6
15 Tanner Scott MIA RP 97 $10
16 Alexis Díaz CIN RP 75 $5
17 Pete Fairbanks TBR RP 88 $15
18 Robert Stephenson LAA RP 208 $3
19 Clay Holmes NYY RP 104 $8

Alvarado’s never held down a closing job for a full season, but with Craig Kimbrel in Baltimore, 2024 looks to be his chance. He still walks more than he should and has only topped 60 innings in a season once, however.

Andrés Muñoz was injured for longer in 2023 than he was in 2022, and his walk and strikeout rates both got worse. But his injury was at the start of the season instead of the end, though he did wear down in September (five earned runs in 10.1 innings).

Jordan Romano missed some time with a back injury, and had his worst ERA (2.90) since his cup of coffee in 2019. He was also as hittable as he’s ever been. That said, his fastball velocity was steady year-over-year and his batted ball metrics arguably improved.

Ryan Helsley’s 2023 season was injury-marred and not as good as his 2022 when he was on the field, but still shoved a triple-digit fastball down hitters’ throats, leading to a strikeout rate of above 35%; he also allowed just one homer in his 36.2 innings of work. His health should never be assumed, however, which knocks him down quite a few spots.

Paul Sewald had an inauspicious beginning to his Diamondbacks tenure, giving up a walk off homer in his first appearance in sedona red, and he additionally got battered in the World Series. His lower-than-typical-for-a-closer velocity will lead to more homers than you’d like, but his elite vertical approach angle and good command give him a pretty high floor.

Things finally clicked for Tanner Scott, whose 2023 walk rate was by far the best of his career, and his 104 strikeouts made him one of the few relievers to get into triple digits. Keeping him from being at least a bit higher on this list is the fear that he’ll have a walk rate relapse.

It was very much a tale of two seasons for Alexis Díaz, who was arguably the best closer in the NL in the first half, but badly faltered to a 4.61 ERA in the second half. He still picked up 37 saves and should undoubtedly enter the 2024 season closing for the Reds, keeping him in this tier.

Pete Fairbanks’s stuff is objectively electric, but he’s got one big problem: injuries. 2023 was his fifth season in the majors, and his 45.2 innings were actually a career-high. It’s tough to forecast a Fairbanks season that doesn’t include an IL trip.

It was a tale of two seasons for Robert Stephenson in 2023, who struggled in Pittsburgh before dominating in a Rays uniform. His turnaround came after he ditched his slider for a cutter, and led to a three-year, $33M deal with the Angels. money that means he’s likelier than not to close. The “flawed” part of his game is that him closing isn’t 100% certain, and we’ve only got a half-season of dominance to go off here.

Clay Holmes will probably never again reach the heights of his first half of 2022, but he put together an altogether solid season in 2023. It doesn’t seem as if he’ll ever be able to avoid those games where he just can’t find the strike zone, though.

(Generally) Steady Vets

Will surely close, and extraordinarly experienced, but not what they once were.
(Generally) Steady Vets
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
20 Craig Kimbrel BAL RP 103 $5
21 Kenley Jansen BOS RP 121 $4

It was a typical season for the recent vintage of the mercurial Craig Kimbrel, whose ERA stood at 8.25 on May 3 before posting a 2.21 ERA with 77 strikeouts in 57 innings the rest of the way. Although he was struggling again by the NLCS, that didn’t stop the Orioles from signing him to be their closer as he looks for his first 30-save campaign since 2018.

Kenley Jansen basically had the reverse of Kimbrel’s season, starting out strong before faltering to give up seven runs in four September appearances, spiking his ERA from 2.74 to 3.63. He’s reportedly on the trade block, though it’s hard to imagine a team acquiring him to do anything but close, meaning his ranking here should be pretty stable.

Half-Season Heroes

These guys didn’t close the whole season–and in some cases only picked up a few here and there–but should enter 2024 in the driver’s seat for their teams. That said, a lack of experience means they might not be very secure in the jobs for long.
Half-Season Heroes
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
22 Mason Miller OAK RP 218 $9
23 Adbert Alzolay CHC RP 116 $8
24 Alex Lange DET RP 178 $0
25 José Leclerc TEX RP 187 -$3
26 Hunter Harvey WSN RP 265 $3
27 Kyle Finnegan WSN RP 239 $0
28 Carlos Estévez LAA RP 244 $1
29 David Robertson TEX RP 321 -$4
30 Justin Lawrence COL RP 373 -$5
31 Robert Suarez SDP RP 218 $1

Hard-throwing Mason Miller will be converted to the bullpen in 2023, and has the leg up on the closer job entering Spring Training. He was solid when healthy but only threw 52.2 innings between the minors and majors.

Adbert Alzolay emerged from the Cubs’s closer committee as the clear choice by the end of the season, ultimately converting 22 saves. The converted starter appears to be in the bullpen for good, but Craig Counsell is never one to shy away from using relievers unconventionally, which could lead to setup men earning more saves.

Alex Lange started the season looking like he could be the Tigers’s All-Star representative, but lost his footing as the season wore on, posting a 5.06 ERA from June 1 through the end of the season. Most troubling was his 34 walks in 42.2 innings in that time. His stuff is undeniably closer-worthy, but he’ll need to find the zone more often to stick.

José Leclerc had a bizarre season, pitching well the whole way through but only earning four saves, with Bruce Bochy calling an audible for Will Smith to be his closer after Leclerc had some walk-heavy, inefficient outings. But by the playoffs, Leclerc was the clear closer, earning another four saves along the way. The David Robertson addition makes Leclerc’s position hold on the closing job a lot looser, but we’ll keep him in this spot for now as we await clarity.

Hunter Harvey finally made it through a mostly healthy season in 2023, setting a new career high with 57 appearances after making it into just 64 in the four years prior. He also earned ten saves, and will be jockeying for position with Kyle Finnegan.

Kyle Finnegan is a spot below Harvey only because his stuff just isn’t as good as Harvey’s, so even if it’s roughly a coin flip as to who closes right now, my guess is that Harvey runs away with the job.

Carlos Estévez was looking like one of the better deals of the offseason in the first half, when he was selected to his first career All-Star game after posting a 1.80 ERA in the first half. But much like the Angels, his performance withered in the second half, with a 6.59 ERA (plus six more unearned runs). His job is in flux after the Robert Stephenson signing, who will both make more than Estévez and had an opposite second half. Estévez could get knocked down quite a bit on this list if Stephenson wins the job outright out of camp.

The Marlins gave up a notable prospect to get David Robertson at the trade deadline, but it didn’t work out, with a 5.06 ERA in 22 games for Miami, ultimately losing his job to Tanner Scott and undoing a lot of good he had done with the Mets. Still, he was throwing harder than ever, and the Rangers rewarded his stuff with an $11.5M contract. Right now, it’s unclear who’ll get the closing reps between Robertson and Leclerc, and they could both make big moves up or down this list depending on who wins out.

Justin Lawrence was one of the more mercurial relievers of the 2023 season, with a 5.40 ERA at home, 1.62 ERA on the road, 2.76 ERA in the first half, 5.22 ERA in the second half, and almost perfectly alternating good and bad months throughout the year. Of those who apepar to have closing jobs at least somewhat locked in at this stage of the offseason, Lawrence is lowest because of his inexperience, lack of success at Coors, and the continued presence of Daniel Bard on the roster.

Robert Suarez never got things going in the first year of his five year, $46 million contract, missing a large chunk of the season and ultimately making it into only 26 games. He was still tough to hit, allowing just 15 hits in 27.2 innings, but his strikeout and homer rates both went in the wrong direction. Still, he’s likeliest to enter the season as the Padres closer, with Yuki Matsui providing competition.

Top Setup Men

Barring injury, these eighth-inning relievers won’t enter 2024 as closers, but they’ve got more than good enough stuff to take over at some point if needed.
Top Setup Men
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
32 Bryan Abreu HOU RP 361 $3
33 Matt Brash SEA RP 283 $1
34 Brusdar Graterol LAD RP 415 $0
35 Chris Martin BOS RP 457 -$3
36 Aroldis Chapman PIT RP 382 $2
37 Yennier Cano BAL RP 339 -$3
38 Kevin Ginkel ARI RP 481 $0
39 Jason Adam TBR RP 317 $3
40 Ryan Pressly HOU RP 295 $4
41 Tyler Rogers SFG RP 720 -$7
42 Jonathan Loáisiga NYY RP 663 -$1
43 Hector Neris CHC RP 419 -$1

Bryan Abreu was one of just a handful of relievers to strike out 100+ hitters in 2023, but he continued to walk over 10% of batters faced. He should continue to get ample opportunities for holds and backup saves, though.

Matt Brash joined Abreu in the 100 strikeout club, and the rubber-armed Canadian appeared in 78 games to boot. Those two spots are pretty interchangeable.

Firethrowing Brusdar Graterol will never strike out as many hitters as his velocity would indicate he perhaps ought to, but his 1.20 ERA made him a key cog in the Dodger bullpen. He also earned seven saves and should get more oppportunities when Dave Roberts chooses to deploy Phillips earlier.

Chris Martin would move up this list if Kenley Jansen is traded, as is reportedly under discussion. He continued to walk almost nobody, with his 4.0% walk rate actually his highest in the last three seasons. That in combination with his sterling 1.05 ERA earned him a down-ballot Cy Young vote.

He’ll never be the best version of himself again, and he’s entering his age-36 season, but Aroldis Chapman had a nice bounceback campaign in a setup role. He potentially could’ve signed somewhere to close, but took $10.5M to be David Bednar’s top setup man in Pittsburgh. He could find himself closing again after the deadline, though.

Going from Twins exile to breakout reliever thanks to just a slight change in arm slot, Yennier Cano bent a little bit as the season went on, but still finished with an excellent 2.11 ERA and eight saves, most coming after Félix Bautista went down with a UCL tear. He’ll return to his setup role with Kimbrel in the fold.

Kevin Ginkel didn’t make the Diamondbacks’ Opening Day roster, but he was rock-solid upon being called back up, and he had his real star turn in the playoffs. Ginkel was untouchable when it really mattered, with ten scoreless appearances and 15 strikeouts in 11.2 innings.

Jason Adam got ample opportunities to close and ultimately picked up 12 saves while Pete Fairbanks was on and off the IL, but he’s further down this list for as long as Fairbanks is healthy. His 2.98 ERA was good but his 4.33 xERA could be pointing towards regression.

Here’s a guy I didn’t expect to send this far down the list at any point in the offseason barring injury, but the Josh Hader signing came together quickly. Ryan Pressly had his worst season as an Astro in 2023, with a 3.58 ERA and his first WHIP above 1.000 since the COVID-shortened 2020 season. Also of note, he’s been held down by some neck and knee injuries in recent years, and the 35-year-old isn’t getting any younger. Adding Hader means he’ll be relegated to being second in line for saves with Bryan Abreu staying in his fireman role.

King of soft contact, Tyler Rogers had another strong season in 2023 and should fill a key role behind Camilo Doval as the likeliest to get backup saves

Jonathan Loáisiga had an injury-ravaged 2023, only appearing in 17 games, but his stuff is undeniable.

The ever-durable Hector Neris had a great year by run-prevention standards, with a career-best in ERA, but his walk rate spiked and he lost a couple ticks on his fastball. Adbert Alzolay had a strong season as Chicago’s closer in his first full season as a reliever, so Neris will more than likely slot in as a setup man and his top backup.

Steady Setup Men

The next tier down from the elite setup men, these relievers are still a good source of holds and the occasional save.
Steady Setup Men
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
44 Erik Swanson TOR RP 516 -$1
45 A.J. Minter ATL RP 454 $3
46 Brooks Raley NYM RP 745 -$8
47 Joe Jiménez ATL RP 672 $1
48 Pierce Johnson ATL RP 652 -$2
49 Jason Foley DET RP 475 -$5
50 Justin Topa SEA RP 743 -$7
51 Josh Sborz TEX RP 580 -$3
52 Brock Stewart MIN RP 643 $2
53 Julian Merryweather CHC RP 542 -$2
54 Joel Payamps MIL RP 528 -$3
55 Taylor Rogers SFG RP 682 $0
56 Emilio Pagán CIN RP 678 -$8
57 Gregory Santos SEA RP $1
58 Griffin Jax MIN RP 526 -$2

Erik Swanson had a nice first season as a Blue Jay, but as usual, homers were something of an issue for him.

Lefty A.J. Minter filled in admirably for Raisel Iglesias to start the season, but is more durable than dominant.

Another southpaw, Brooks Raley has reinvented himself since coming back to the States for the 2020 season, and is next in line for save chances if the Mets want to ensure Edwin Díaz gets a slightly softer landing coming off his ACL surgery.

Joe Jiménez will always give up his fair share of homers, but he’s had back-to-back strong seasons as a setup man.

Curveball-happy Pierce Johnson had a Stephenson-esque effect on the Braves, and would have a strong case to close somewhere if he had entered free agency instead of taking an extension. Instead, he’ll be a key setup man for Iglesias.

Jason Foley was one of the more difficult relievers to elevate against, giving up just two homers in 69 innings. He picked up seven saves when Lange faltered.

32-year-old Justin Topa finally had a healthy season, throwing 69 innings, most in a season since he had 81.1 in the minors way back in 2014. He didn’t even make the Mariners’s Opening Day roster but made 75 appearances.

Things were pretty rough for Josh Sborz in the season, but peripheral statistics have always liked him better than ERA, and he was excellent in the postseason. 2024 will be an important prove-it year.

31-year-old Brock Stewart was exiled from the majors between 2020 and 2022, returning triumphantly with a few extra ticks on his fastball and a 0.65 ERA in 27.2 innings. If his elbow holds up, he could be in for a big year.

Yet another breakout on the wrong side of 30, Julian Merryweather held up for the entirety of 2023, having his first healthy season since his 2017 minor league campaign. He struck out 98 in 72 innings, albeit with 36 walks.

Joel Payamps might be done bouncing around the league after putting together a 2.55 ERA and being a key setup man in Milwaukee.

Taylor Rogers didn’t have as good a year as his brother, but rebounded after an awful start to finish his year with a 2.79 ERA in his final 55 appearances.

Emilio Pagán is coming off his best season since 2019 and had his first season ever with under 1.0 HR/9, but a move to Great American Ball Park makes a repeat difficult.

Down on the South Side of Chicago, Gregory Santos was one of the biggest breakout relievers of the season, ultimately getting some closing opportunities by the end of the season. He looked to be in the driver’s seat for save chances in 2024, but his trade to the Mariners knocks him down this list. He’s now third in line for saves in Seattle, behind Muñoz and Brash, but lat soreness knocks him down on the list a bit.

With Pagán gone from Minnesota, Griffin Jax takes on a more important role in the Twins’ pen. He started strong but withered down the stretch.

Trendy Breakout Picks

Some relievers listed here could even start out closing, but most are pitchers with great stuff who are likelier to earn holds than saves.
Trendy Breakout Picks
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
59 Yuki Matsui SDP RP $2
60 Jeff Hoffman PHI RP 445 -$2
61 John McMillon KCR RP 656 -$9
62 Trevor Megill MIL RP 703 $0
63 James McArthur KCR RP 352 -$5
64 Abner Uribe MIL RP 497 -$4
65 Ben Joyce LAA RP 648 -$8

Japanese lefty Yuki Matsui could share closing chances with Robert Suarez, with his small stature actually helping his fastball achieve elite VAA.

Really, Jeff Hoffman already had his breakout, but with Craig Kimbrel in Baltimore he’ll take on an even more crucial role in Philadelphia. Rob Thomson isn’t one to shy away from being situational, which could lead to Hoffman earning some saves.

Four dominant MLB innings coming off a minor league breakout get John McMillon on the list, as he finally got his walk rate under control. He could earn saves as part of a committee.

Few arms are as physically imposing as Trevor Megill, who looks to have gotten his mechanics in sync with his 6’8″ frame. He’ll start out in middle relief, but xERA and 2024 projections both love him.

James McArthur’s 2023 bottom line wasn’t great, but he had an excellent September.

Abner Uribe is one of the hardest throwers in the majors, but his walk rate might keep him in middle relief.

Ben Joyce gets essentually the same report as Uribe, with some extra injury risk baked in.

Experienced But Shaky

These setup men and middle relievers have closed aplenty in their careers, but are buried on the depth chart and/or have too many flaws to be viewed as significant sources of value to start the season.
Experienced But Shaky
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
66 Gregory Soto PHI RP ▲1 601 -$4
67 Scott Barlow CLE RP ▲1 467 $0
68 Kirby Yates TEX RP ▲1 562 -$8
69 Will Smith KCR RP ▲1 293 -$5
70 Nick Anderson KCR RP ▲1 584 -$8
71 Giovanny Gallegos STL RP ▲1 532 $1
72 John Brebbia CHW RP ▼6 389 -$2

Gregory Soto finally got his walk rate under control, and despite his high ERA he allowed the lowest hard-hit rate and average exit velocity of his career. Still, he’s lower on the depth chart and needs more of a track record of throwing strikes.

Breaking-ball happy Scott Barlow rebounded after being traded to the Padres and working in a setup role, but he’s lost velocity on his fastball and won’t be able to supplant Emmanuel Clase as closer.

On the very surface, things looked good for Kirby Yates, but his walk rate spiked. Entering his age-37 season, he’s likelier to end up a middle reliever than closer, especially if the Rangers aren’t done adding to the bullpen.

Will Smith returns to where it all started for him, coming off a rough finish to his season and a postseason relegated to mop-up duty.

2023 started off solidly for Anderson, albeit with reduced velocity. After missing the whole second half with a shoulder strain, he’ll look for his first fully healthy year since his 2019 rookie campaign.

Giovanny Gallegos has always had to thread the needle as a slider-happy righty who doesn’t throw super hard, and his ERA spiked while he gave up 11 homers. Still, he could earn double-digit saves knowing Ryan Helsley often gets hurt.

I wasn’t expecting to have to add John Brebbia to this list after finishing up the first entry, but his signing with the White Sox made things interesting, and it makes things especially interesting now that he’s likeliest to earn save chances for the White Sox. The Sox easily have the most unsettled closing situation in the majors, and it got more unsettled when Brebbia suffered a calf strain early in camp. He think he’ll be ready for the season, but I’ve bumped him down a bit for now.

Stretched to Start?

The three pitchers here have starting experience and will reportedly be stretched out in Spring Training, which makes ranking them difficult.
Stretched to Start?
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
73 A.J. Puk MIA RP/SP 383 $2
74 Reynaldo López ATL RP/SP 457 $3
75 Jordan Hicks SFG SP/RP 320 $2

It feels likelier than not that A.J. Puk will end up back in the bullpen anyway, but even if he does, he’s coming off a rough finish to his season. His chances to stay stretched out increase if the Marlins trade a starter away.

Hard-throwing Reynaldo López had a much better year than Puk, but he’s a spot lower because the Braves appear to be giving him more of a chance to win the fifth spot in the rotation. He’ll battle Bryce Elder, A.J. Smith-Shawver, Hurston Waldrep, and Dylan Dodd.

In a surprise move, the Giants signed Jordan Hicks not to bolster what would be a deep bullpen, but to perhaps start. There’s no way Hicks makes it through a whole season of starting–he’s just not going to throw 150 innings a year after 65.2. So he stays on these rankings under the assumption he could and probably will bounce back and forth, at a certain point forming a great back-end with Doval and the Rogers brothers.

Injured Elite(?)

This reliever will miss at least half of 2024, but could provide significant value in 2025.
Injured Elite(?)
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
76 Liam Hendriks BOS RP 730

Although his triumphant return from cancer was dashed by a torn UCL, it was still nice to see Liam Hendriks back on the field the same year as his diagnosis. He’s aiming to be back with the Red Sox by August 1, though that’s a very aggressive timetable of 365 days after surgery.


Full Rankings Without Tiers

No tiers. Just the rankings.
Full Rankings Without Tiers
Rank Name Team Pos Change ADP $
1 Edwin Díaz NYM RP 42 $19
2 Josh Hader HOU RP 47 $13
3 Emmanuel Clase CLE RP 53 $13
4 Jhoan Duran MIN RP 51 $16
5 Camilo Doval SFG RP 56 $10
6 Devin Williams MIL RP 43 $14
7 Evan Phillips LAD RP 90 $8
8 Raisel Iglesias ATL RP 60 $12
9 David Bednar PIT RP 64 $10
10 José Alvarado PHI RP 162 $8
11 Andrés Muñoz SEA RP 84 $15
12 Jordan Romano TOR RP 70 $11
13 Ryan Helsley STL RP 92 $11
14 Paul Sewald ARI RP 85 $6
15 Tanner Scott MIA RP 97 $10
16 Alexis Díaz CIN RP 75 $5
17 Pete Fairbanks TBR RP 88 $15
18 Robert Stephenson LAA RP 208 $3
19 Clay Holmes NYY RP 104 $8
20 Craig Kimbrel BAL RP 103 $5
21 Kenley Jansen BOS RP 121 $4
22 Mason Miller OAK RP 218 $9
23 Adbert Alzolay CHC RP 116 $8
24 Alex Lange DET RP 178 $0
25 José Leclerc TEX RP 187 -$3
26 Hunter Harvey WSN RP 265 $3
27 Kyle Finnegan WSN RP 239 $0
28 Carlos Estévez LAA RP 244 $1
29 David Robertson TEX RP 321 -$4
30 Justin Lawrence COL RP 373 -$5
31 Robert Suarez SDP RP 218 $1
32 Bryan Abreu HOU RP 361 $3
33 Matt Brash SEA RP 283 $1
34 Brusdar Graterol LAD RP 415 $0
35 Chris Martin BOS RP 457 -$3
36 Aroldis Chapman PIT RP 382 $2
37 Yennier Cano BAL RP 339 -$3
38 Kevin Ginkel ARI RP 481 $0
39 Jason Adam TBR RP 317 $3
40 Ryan Pressly HOU RP 295 $4
41 Tyler Rogers SFG RP 720 -$7
42 Jonathan Loáisiga NYY RP 663 -$1
43 Hector Neris CHC RP 419 -$1
44 Erik Swanson TOR RP 516 -$1
45 A.J. Minter ATL RP 454 $3
46 Brooks Raley NYM RP 745 -$8
47 Joe Jiménez ATL RP 672 $1
48 Pierce Johnson ATL RP 652 -$2
49 Jason Foley DET RP 475 -$5
50 Justin Topa SEA RP 743 -$7
51 Josh Sborz TEX RP 580 -$3
52 Brock Stewart MIN RP 643 $2
53 Julian Merryweather CHC RP 542 -$2
54 Joel Payamps MIL RP 528 -$3
55 Taylor Rogers SFG RP 682 $0
56 Emilio Pagán CIN RP 678 -$8
57 Gregory Santos SEA RP $1
58 Griffin Jax MIN RP 526 -$2
59 Yuki Matsui SDP RP $2
60 Jeff Hoffman PHI RP 445 -$2
61 John McMillon KCR RP 656 -$9
62 Trevor Megill MIL RP 703 $0
63 James McArthur KCR RP 352 -$5
64 Abner Uribe MIL RP 497 -$4
65 Ben Joyce LAA RP 648 -$8
66 Gregory Soto PHI RP ▲1 601 -$4
67 Scott Barlow CLE RP ▲1 467 $0
68 Kirby Yates TEX RP ▲1 562 -$8
69 Will Smith KCR RP ▲1 293 -$5
70 Nick Anderson KCR RP ▲1 584 -$8
71 Giovanny Gallegos STL RP ▲1 532 $1
72 John Brebbia CHW RP ▼6 389 -$2
73 A.J. Puk MIA RP/SP 383 $2
74 Reynaldo López ATL RP/SP 457 $3
75 Jordan Hicks SFG SP/RP 320 $2
76 Liam Hendriks BOS RP 730





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dl80
1 month ago

In the write-up, you wrote “Brandon Finnegan” instead of Kyle Finnegan. Unfortunately, Brandon never panned out after all the injuries.

Also, should Tim Mayza be in “Steady Setup Men,” or does he not strike out enough guys to be useful? I’d certainly trust him more than Stewart, Merryweather, or Taylor Rogers.

LightenUpFGmember
1 month ago
Reply to  dl80

Still got “Brandon Finnegan” in the write up even after the update … hey, read the comments, they can be informative!